What Jim Kelly told an astonished crowd in Boca Raton three years ago still applies in facing down cancer

  Three years ago this month Jim Kelly gave a speech at an Inspiration Breakfast benefiting the YMCA of South Palm Beach County.
  A large crowd was on hand to hear him at the corporate headquarters of Office Depot in Boca Raton. Not just because Kelly is a Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback, inducted in his first year of eligibility back in 2002. Not just because he starred at the University of Miami during Howard Schnellenberger’s foundational work there, either.
BLOOMINGTON, MN – NFL Hall of Famer Jim Kelly does a show on Super Bowl LII Radio Row at the Mall of America on February 1, 2018. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SiriusXM)

What drives people to Kelly’s side more quickly than any of that is his very public battle with oral cancer and the bold and hopeful attitude he brings to the mission.

  Cancer touches every family at some point or another. No, “touches” is the wrong word. Cancer pulverizes.
  So when Kelly gave that speech here in 2015, one like so many others he has given nationwide, it was to build as much immunity as possible against the despair that is this killer’s specialty. He spoke of the strength he derived from all the encouraging cards and promised prayers he had received. He spoke of faith as the armor to be worn in this personal struggle and any other.
  And now, in a statement released on Thursday, Kelly is announcing that his cancer, beaten back for a time by extensive surgery and chemotherapy and radiation treatment, has returned.
  It’s not an unusual story in terms of recurrence and the need to ramp up for another scary wave of certain punishment with uncertain results, but fortunately Kelly is an unusual man, and his family is every bit as impressive. No doubt, in time, they will be back before another large group, summoning courage from all who are there and inspiring all to stay “Kelly Tough.”
  Until then, the best I can do is return to my column from that Boca Raton appearance three years back. There is inspiration here, and it comes with no expiration date.
(Here follows a column from the Palm Beach Post on March 25, 2015)
by Dave George
Palm Beach Post Columnist
 It pays to be sitting down when Jim Kelly runs through the menu of surgical procedures he has gone through, and much of it in the last few years since cancer was discovered in his upper jaw.
“In two years’ time, I had a plate and six screws put in my neck, and then six months before that I had two plates and 10 screws in my back,” Kelly said Tuesday at the YMCA of South Palm Beach County’s Inspiration Breakfast. “I had double hernia surgery. I had six root canals. I was diagnosed with cancer and I had my jaw removed.”
There were gasps in the audience at the Office Depot corporate headquarters as the former University of Miami and Buffalo Bills quarterback rattled through that daunting list as rapidly as if he were calling out plays in the huddle.
Then came the clincher. Just a few months ago, with the gravest danger behind him and MRI cancer scans becoming less frequent, Kelly, 55, learned for the first time that doctors had given him less than a 10 percent chance to survive in the midst of his most aggressive cancer treatments.
Why did it take so long for him to hear that? Because his wife and daughters and friends wanted to keep Kelly’s psyche safe while his body was under attack.
“People that walked into my hospital room, even though I was having some of the worst days of my life, for those minutes and hours that those people were in my room, they made a difference,” Kelly said. “Hey, I grew up in a family of six boys. I had physical toughness. Where I needed it was the mental toughness. I needed people to tell me and show me with their smiles that I could do it, and don’t ever give up.”
Not a bad lesson to all of us who struggle with knowing what to do or say when someone close is critically ill. Keep the energy positive. Recycle a few giggles from sillier times. They might still have a little charge left in them.
Imagine, for instance, how often Kelly has heard about his great Bills teams losing four consecutive Super Bowls. Howard Schnellenberger, his old Hurricanes coach, even spent a few light minutes on that topic Tuesday while inviting Kelly up to the stage.
That didn’t even faze Kelly, who used a few squirts of mouth spray before his speech and explained that it’s not because of bad breath. Truth is, he no longer is able to produce saliva.
Can’t believe how good he looks, trim but not gaunt. Can’t believe he worries about lisping ever so slightly as a result of the prosthetic jaw and teeth that followed surgery. Nobody at the YMCA event noticed that. They were too busy coming up to Kelly to tell survival stories of their own and to thank him for the inspiration.
“So good to see you,” many of them said.
“Better to be seen than viewed,” Kelly regularly shoots back.
There are many appearances like this for Kelly, who still lives in Buffalo and in October will speak before a group in Rochester that provides services for the mentally ill. As always, his charitable activities center around the Hunter’s Hope Foundation, established to aid research on Krabbe Disease, the genetic disorder that ended the life of Kelly’s son, Hunter, in 2005 at the age of 8.
At Kelly’s induction to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002, he dedicated his speech to Hunter, an exceedingly brave little boy.
To spend much time with Kelly, however, is to laugh a lot, and eventually to talk about the Bills, who are trying to rev it all up again under new coach Rex Ryan.
“I love it,” Kelly said in the VIP reception room after posing for photos with a long line of YMCA donors. “The biggest question is whether it’s going to be EJ Manuel or Matt Cassel, but I just hope that one of the quarterbacks steps up because that’s all we need.”
Just a whiff of hope and the tank is filled once more.

Wondering if No. 22 draft spot, where Dolphins are picking, is haunted

 

It’s an oddity, but the Miami Dolphins have never owned the No. 22 overall selection in an NFL draft, which is where they sit for April’s edition.

Don’t know if this development will be groundbreaking or heartbreaking, but there has been plenty of both to choose from at that number through the years.

Pittsburgh got Ernie Stautner at No. 22 in 1950. He’s the only Pro Football Hall of Famer ever selected at that spot. Of course, it’s been a while, but that at least is mildly encouraging for Dolphins fans.

FILE - In this May 8, 2014, file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel reacts after being selected by the Cleveland Browns as the 22nd pick during the first round of the NFL Draft in New York. The Browns indicated Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016, that they’ve finally had enough of Manziel’s bad-boy behavior and intend to release the quarterback in March when the league begins its next calendar year. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
FILE – In this May 8, 2014, file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel reacts after being selected by the Cleveland Browns as the 22nd pick during the first round of the NFL Draft in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)

On the other hand, the Cleveland Browns have taken Johnny Manziel, Brandon Weeden and Brady Quinn at No. 22 in recent years. Makes you think that spot might actually be haunted.

William “Refrigerator” Perry went to Chicago at No. 22 in 1985. Now we’re in the realm of NFL folklore. A 335-pound monster versatile enough to run for a Super Bowl touchdown, and so entertaining that he actually made coach Mike Ditka share some of the headlines.

Demaryius Thomas was a nice pick at No. 22 for Denver in 2010. He quickly became a Pro Bowler at wide receiver and was one of Adam Gase’s favorites there.

On the nastier side, at least from a Dolphins standpoint, is Bud Dupree, the Pittsburgh linebacker who drew a roughing-the-passer penalty for a vicious hit on Matt Moore in the wild-card playoff game a couple of weeks ago. Never hurts to have a little nasty on defense, though. Getting a kid like Dupree could potentially transform Miami’s leaky linebacker corps.

All of this has me wondering what will be available when the Dolphins’ turn comes around. Not specifically, but in terms of general quality and immediate utility.

Obviously, it won’t be the cream of the crop. Because the Dolphins had a better season (10-6 and a wild-card playoff appearance), their drafting order gets worse, and so do the chances of finding a sure starter in the first round.

Don Shula had pretty good luck finding reliable players in this general range, however.

Here are the guys Miami has taken within a spot or two of No. 22 throughout the years. Judge for yourself.

Offensive tackle Darryl Carlton – No. 23 in 1975 (traded to Tampa Bay after two disappointing seasons)

Offensive tackle Jon Giesler – No. 24 in 1979 (10 solid seasons at left tackle, including the early Marino years)

Cornerback Don McNeal – No. 21 in 1980 (Instant starter, played in two Super Bowls)

Offensive lineman Roy Foster – No. 24 in 1982 (Two-time Pro Bowler, also caught TD pass from Marino)

Wide receiver Randal Hill – No. 23 in 1991 (5 starts and 4 touchdown catches in brief Miami career)