Who knew Trevor Hoffman was bound for Cooperstown when Marlins traded him away?

 

I won’t bother rattling off the names of the minor-leaguers Miami got back in the trades that jettisoned Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, Christian Yelich and Dee Gordon.

If you’re a major seamhead, those names are already familiar and so are their prospects of ever making the Marlins’ roster. And if you’re not a major seamhead, who cares?

12 Apr 1993: Trevor Hoffman pitches for the Florida Marlins during a game against the San Francisco Giants. (Photo by Otto Greule /Allsport)

Every now and again, however, there is proof that the scouts really do know what they are doing, and that getting the best you can out of dump-off trades like these is worth the extra research.

Consider Trevor Hoffman, voted this week into baseball’s Hall of Fame as one of the most reliable closers ever.

San Diego fans couldn’t have been too excited about hearing Hoffman included in a 1993 trade that was coming their way. They were focused instead on the Padres’ frustrating fire sale, which sent Gary Sheffield to Miami and unloaded other high-priced talent, too.

There certainly was no complaint from me over losing Hoffman or the two minor-league pitching prospects that left with him for San Diego. The skinny right-hander was a rookie with the Marlins, learning what he could by watching 45-save star Bryan Harvey and understanding that he probably wouldn’t be in the majors at all if not for being with the Marlins in their inaugural expansion season.

Two wins, two losses and two saves, that’s what Hoffman contributed to the Marlins. He was off to a good start, but nothing that would indicate Cooperstown as his eventual destination.

Sheffield, meanwhile, was a proven slugger and a National League batting champion when he came over for the first of six productive seasons in Miami. He was a big hit, leading the Marlins to a World Series title in 1997 and ending up with 509 career home runs, but he’s not yet in the Hall of Fame and probably never will be. He got just 11.1 percent of the vote this week, too far from the 75 percent requirement to imagine it possible.

So what’s the lesson? Nothing, except that baseball is ridiculous sometimes.

Maybe Derek Jeter has a new superstar hidden somewhere within the package of no-names he has picked up by trade. That would be cool, but only if the Marlins bother to pay him and keep him rather than working some other giveaway deal in the future.

The other former Marlins in the Hall of Fame are Pudge Rodriguez (who played here one season but made it count with a World Series title) plus Tim Raines and Andre Dawson (each stopped by in their 40’s to wrap up long careers) and Mike Piazza (who whistled through Miami for 18 at-bats in 1998).

[Player-coach is the only thing left for LeBron James to do]

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