Wishing for Marlins’ All-Stars a better experience than poor Dan Uggla got

What would be a dream performance for Marcell Ozuna or Giancarlo Stanton playing at Marlins Park in Tuesday’s All-Star Game?

Well, something along the lines of Ted Williams’ day at Fenway Park in the 1946 All-Star Game would do.

Teddy Ballgame went 4-for-4 with a couple of home runs and five RBI in that 12-0 American League victory. His 10 total bases were a single-game record for the Midsummer Classic, along with just every other thing he did.

Heck, if there had been a Home Run Derby back then, Williams probably would have won that, too.

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Yes, something like that would be great to see from one of the Marlins in the combined showcase of Monday and Tuesday nights. And what is it that we absolutely, positively don’t want to see?

Florida Marlins second baseman Dan Uggla pictured in 2010, the last of his five seasons with the team. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari)

Think Dan Uggla in 2008 at Yankee Stadium.

For openers, the Marlins second baseman finished fifth in the Home Run Derby with six balls hit out of the park.

Then, after subbing in for starter Chase Utley, Uggla got caught in one of the longest and lousiest All-Star experiences ever.

Because the game lasted 15 innings and ended at the ungodly hour of 1:38 a.m., Uggla came to the plate four times, striking out on three of those appearances and grounding into a double play on the other. Oh, and one of those whiffs came with the bases loaded.

It was even worse in the field. Three errors, including two on consecutive plays in the 10th inning.

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When the American League finally won on a sacrifice fly by Texas’ Michael Young in the 15th, it should have come as a relief to Uggla. Instead, he stood at his locker expressing the kind of self-confidence that made him an All-Star in the first place.

“I know what kind of player I am,” Uggla said. “I’m fine. The only thing I’m mad about is that we lost. I never was down. You shake it off, you move on, and you keep playing.””

He meant what he said because the rest of Uggla’s season was a success, with 32 homers and 92 RBI.