Escalation of Super Bowl hosting requirements started with botch job by New Orleans

All this angst over how much it costs and how much it takes to become a Super Bowl host city in the 21st century? I blame it all on New Orleans.

That’s where the first indoor Super Bowl was played in 1978, setting a new standard for the pampering of team owners and fans.

Even worse, New Orleans did the most of any city to disappoint team owners and to remind them of how lousy an outdoor Super Bowl can be.

That happened in the summer of 1974, when construction was going so slowly on the Louisiana Superdome that completion couldn’t be guaranteed for a grand-opening Super Bowl scheduled to be played there on Jan. 12, 1975.

tulaneReluctantly, the league moved the game to old Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, where two previous Super Bowls had been played, including the Miami Dolphins’ first appearance, a 24-3 loss to the Dallas Cowboys.

Wouldn’t you know it, the weather was lousy for the relocated Super Bowl IX, damp and blustery and 46 degrees at kickoff, with the mercury diving after that. Pittsburgh beat Minnesota 16-6 on a day when the winning quarterback, Terry Bradshaw, passed for 96 yards.

By halftime the only score was a safety on an end-zone sack of Vikings quarterback Fran Tarkenton. Yuck.

[Missing on LaMarcus Aldridge doesn’t sting Heat because of Whiteside’s growth]

[Kyle Lowry’s Game 3 breakout is where Heat lost control of series]

[QB Brandon Doughty well worth a 7th-round pick for Dolphins]

Anyway, the Dolphins can only hope now that they are to snuff with their bid for a Super Bowl host spot in 2019, 2020 or 2021, having committed $450 million to stadium renovations in Miami Gardens.

Tough to think of the original Joe Robbie/Pro Player/Sun Life building being considered by NFL owners to be unusable.

Tulane Stadium, the facility used for a Super Bowl in January of 1975, was condemned later that same year, and on the day that the Superdome officially opened for business.