Spieth’s spectacular season was average output for the Tiger of old

Jordan Spieth just wrapped up one of the greatest seasons in the history of the PGA Tour, with two major titles and five wins overall and a Vardon Trophy to confirm the validity of his Player of the Year award.

Stupendous stuff, but there was a time when this was standard output for Tiger Woods, one crushing year after another.

AUGUSTA, GA - APRIL 08: Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth of the United States walk together during a practice round prior to the start of the 2015 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 8, 2015 in Augusta, Georgia. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

AUGUSTA, GA – APRIL 08: Tiger Woods and Jordan Spieth walk together during a practice round prior to the start of the 2015 Masters Tournament. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

At his peak, Tiger really was unstoppable. He will chase forever the kind of efficiency and aggressiveness that made him that way. So will everyone else who is playing this game today or will in the future.

Consider that Spieth won the Vardon with an average score of 68.911 on the PGA Tour. Tiger won the award nine times, and in all but one of those seasons his average was lower than that.

Spieth is ranked No. 1 in the world at season’s end. That’s where Tiger ended up 10 times.

Spieth won two major championships, the Masters and the U.S. Open. There were four seasons in which Tiger won two majors, and in 2000 he won three of them, all but the Masters.

Five PGA Tour victories is a lot for Spieth or anyone else in one PGA Tour season. Tiger won at least five tournaments in 11 different seasons. Five other times he won more.

There is one area in which Tiger matched Spieth in 2015, but it’s not anything he’ll care to remember.

Both of them missed four cuts. Spieth, of course, did it in the course of 25 events. Tiger played only 11.

No matter what happens or doesn’t happen with the rest of Tiger’s career, the grip he once held on the game will never be matched.

We’re not talking mere numbers here. We’re talking sledgehammer certainty in a country club world.